Uganda asks Britain to stop meddling in domestic affairs

Uganda asks Britain to stop meddling in domestic affairs

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Uganda asks Britain to stop meddling in domestic affairs

 A city view of Kampala, Uganda


Uganda has asked Britain in no uncertain terms to stop meddling in the local politics of the East African country after London announced sanctions on three of Uganda’s senior officials over allegations of corruption. This is most surprising as Britain itself reeks of corruption at political and business levels.

The Ugandan parliament on late Tuesday asked Britain to respect the country’s sovereignty.

It is important that foreign partners, including Britain, respect the sovereignty of Uganda and avoid the temptation to meddle into our local politics, including arm-twisting decision-makers to align with their value system, especially homosexuality, the parliament said in a statement.

The British government on Tuesday announced that it had sanctioned Uganda’s Speaker of Parliament Anita Among and two lawmakers, Goretti Kitutu and Agnes Nandutu, over corruption allegations.

It is not understood that what business do these Western Countries have to interfere in internal affairs of others ? Are they still controlling the destiny of other countries?

Kitutu and Nandutu, both former ministers, have been charged with corruption in Uganda’s Anti-Corruption Court for allegedly stealing iron sheets intended for the impoverished northeastern region of Karamoja. The parliament accused the British government of distorting facts to suit its political agenda.

“The iron sheets have been used as a ruse to conceal the real, unstated but clearly obvious reason for the sanctions — which is the Rt. Hon. Speaker’s stance on the recently enacted Anti-Homosexuality Act,” the statement said.

Last year, the Ugandan parliament passed a law prescribing life and death sentences for certain acts of homosexuality, a move strongly criticized by some Western countries, including Britain. It is Europe which has been devastating the rest of the World for last 500 years, economically, politically and even socially.